Why 'Following Up' is essential in landing a job - Hush
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Why 'Following Up' is essential in landing a job

Following up after a job interview can be stressful. We don’t want to come across as someone who is irritating or pushy. We don’t want to annoy them; but, we are filled with curiosity over what happened and whether we got the job or not. We’re scared to ask, and most often, we don’t think it matters.

However, the news is—it does matter! If done right, following up shouldn’t hurt your chances of getting a job. In fact, in some cases, it can help.

Here are some reasons why following up shouldn’t be a bad idea at all. 

You can rest at ease

Hiring managers tell us that we will be notified within a certain period of time, but that certain period of time never comes.

It’s much easier to overthink and come to a conclusion by ourselves as to what has already happened but fret not. This doesn’t mean that your chances as a candidate delayed their response. They’re probably busy. There could be competing priorities, someone out of the office, or other interviews going on. There’s even a chance the recruiter simply forgot, and you’ll be surprised as to how common this is. And once you know what’s up, you’ll be able to relax a bit.

The best method is to write at least four days after the date of the interview, so as to not come off as annoying. There’s no harm in doing this in this way. 

You can frame your message this way:

Dear [Hiring Manager],

I hope you are doing well. I wanted to drop an e-mail and check if there was an update in my position’s status, which I interviewed for on [date]. I’m still very interested and look forward to hearing back from you.

Best,

[Your Name]

You can boost your chances correctly

After an interview, it’s customary to send a thank you note. And after a few days, you might think of a few ways you could have done better. Ask different questions or something else, or maybe inform them of your own skills about something you failed to mention to them before. 

When this happens, a follow-up note is a perfect time to show that the company is still on your mind. Let them know that you’re really thinking over how you can help. Start with asking for an update and then go into your business question or suggestion.

You can finally seek closure

Maybe the offer you’ve got is a good and is something that you’ll be pleased with. But you might not have any idea if this offer is officially yours, you’re probably sweating buckets. You don’t want to lose the chance of a good job when it’s almost in your hands. But, you aren’t ready to give up hope for a position at your dream company.

In this situation, following up can push the hiring manager at the job and if you’re lucky, the process might be accelerated. Or, at the least, it can give you closure and help you focus your energy on the opportunity at hand. 

Dear [Hiring Manager],

I hope you’re doing well. I just wanted to drop an e-mail to check if there was an update of my position’s status, which I interviewed for on [date]. I’m still interested and wanted to get an update on my candidacy and the timeline before making a decision. Please let me know when you have a moment.

Thanks!

[Your Name]

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